Rowing with Low Back Pain? Give these a shot.

9 times out of 10, when one of my rowers says, “coach, my back hurts,” a few sessions of this stretching sequence plus some general foam rolling of the lower body has them right before their next workout. Even with these stretches, it is crucial to address WHY you are experiencing low back pain, whether it’s a muscular weakness or a technical deficiency, but these stretches should get you up and moving in the meantime. This is also a great 10-minute mobility series during heavy training times and as general prevention of low back pain in rowing.

Hold each stretch for 30-60 seconds. Breathe deeply and try to sink deeper into the stretch with each exhalation.

  1. Pigeon Stretch & Elevated Pigeon
  2. Half-kneeling lunge stretch, 3-way hip opener, lunge with band distraction
  3. Banded figure-4 (link here to orange band)
  4. QL stretch

Roundtable Recap: Sport Psych for Rowing

What a monster this one was! Blake, Joe, and I had a great talk with Sara Hendershot about sport psych for rowing and how to develop a strong mindset for success. We talked for almost 90 minutes straight and I feel like we could’ve all kept going. Whether you’re wrapping up winter season, preparing for spring racing, or just blew up at the CRASH-B’s, I hope this will be helpful to you in your athletic pursuits.

Hear it also on Soundcloud and iTunes

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2016 Year in Review

2016 was a busy year.

I started this site in 2015 and I really appreciate everyone who read, shared, and commented in 2016 to keep driving me to write more content here.

One of my favorite things to come out of this year was working with fellow rowing strength coaches Blake Gourley and Joe Deleo to start the Strength Coach Roundtable on Rowperfect UK’s Rowing Chat channel. We’ve done four episodes and will do our fifth in February on the topic of Performance Psychology for Rowers. Mental skills training is a passion of mine so I’m really excited for this episode.

Top Articles from 2016

I’m glad, and a bit surprised, at the popularity of the specialization article. It ventures out a bit from my usual strength training content but seemed to strike a chord with my readers. It was shared on Facebook massively and I hope changed some minds on specialization and informed on long-term athletic development.

I also got to work with some other coaches in 2016, writing guest articles for Rufo Optimal Workouts (“Stay Positive to Beat the Injury Blues“) and TeamSnap as well as becoming a guest on the Winning Youth Coaching podcast and being featured in a US-Rowing article on masters training.

Back to Class

I also returned to formal education at the University of Denver’s MA in Sport Coaching program. I honestly can’t say enough good things about this program. It is a new program and they’ve done a masterful job creating an innovative learning environment and curriculum that is both immediately applicable AND deeply thought-provoking. It is entirely online, designed with coaches in mind so as to maximize coaching time with your current teams, not requiring uprooting or time away from your athletes. The online coursework is engaging and my professors are top notch, using video conferences, recorded video lectures, and rapid-fire responses on email, social media, and the discussion boards. My classmates are also awesome. Everyone is really motivated to learn and collaborate, and the discussion boards are a goldmine of hundreds of years of cumulative coaching experience across dozens of sports.

Coaching

After coaching full time in the fall, I’m excited for rowing season to begin again soon. Like many non-tropical programs, here in the north we’ll be focusing heavily on indoor training with weights, ergs, and cross-training. I consider this a huge opportunity to refine skills in a more controlled environment than on the water. Lacrosse will start in March and a new role for me as varsity assistant and defensive coordinator, plus a whole bunch of new ideas thanks to an offseason of learning for me from my Denver curriculum and other resources.

I also co-founded an off-season lacrosse club program last summer for 5th-11th graders and we’ve gotten enough momentum to offer more playing opportunities in 2017. This is a fun project for me from a coaching, long-term curriculum development, and business side of things. I’ve struggled at times with this because I consider most off-season club programs to be the root of all evil in youth sports. This has been my motivation to make a program that does actually work and doesn’t just serve as another exclusive club that sacrifices individual coaching and athletes’ health for flashy tournaments.

Coming Up Next

I cut back my long-form article writing in 2016. With 75+ articles published and available for free about strength training for rowing and lacrosse as well as sport psychology and coaching, I’ve been working more on some other projects. One of those is a website redesign, which should be wrapped up soon, to make it easier to find what you’re looking for on here. Another is a second version of Rowing Stronger, which I hope to finish in the first half of 2017. It has done well since publishing in October 2015 but I’ve done a lot of writing and coaching since then and want to update it to make it even better. The second version will also be available in print. Finally, I plan on doing more instructional, demonstration, and explanation videos, so stay tuned for that as well as more from the Strength Coach Roundtable.

My email list gets first notice on any new events and updates, as well as a weekly email with more thoughts from my coaching and learning, so subscribe below if you’re interested in more.

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The 10 Best Strength Training Exercises for Rowing

We’re keeping it simple this winter and focusing on what I’ve culled down to the most effective 10 strength training exercises for rowing. These exercises are a mix of rowing performance exercises, included to increase strength in muscles used heavily in the stroke to drop time off splits, as well as exercises for injury prevention and overall muscular balance and health. Check out the playlist with video demonstrations and coaching cues here and then read on for explanations.

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Bundle: Winter Rowing Training

As the fall head racing season wraps up in the US, many teams and rowers are looking to avoid the ice and frostbite by ditching the oars and moving into the weightroom and onto the ergs. Here’s a bundle of articles that will be useful to you as you plan your winter training.

If you’re a spring 2k rower following the block periodization system, the winter training block will be about half specific preparation and half pre-competitive, depending on when exactly your fall season ends and your spring season begins. The typical rowing team will conclude fall in mid-November and resume water training in mid-February. In between the seasons is a great time to restore bilateral (left/right) balance and make great gains to set up the spring competitive training block. Cerg1heck out “The Basics of Strength Training for Rowing” for an overview of annual periodization and how all of these blocks fit together with the goal of peak spring 2k performance, then read the other articles for how to accomplish it!

Overview

Learn the Lifts

Improve Your Mobility

The Strength Coach Roundtable

Keep in touch over winter training

Subscribe to my email list so you can stay tuned for the next Strength Coach Roundtable episode and hear about some of the techniques I’ll be experimenting with over winter season. Email subscribers get exclusive content about training, coaching, and my studies that doesn’t necessarily make an official blog post.

Roundtable #4 Recap: Recovery

We really jammed a lot into this episode to talk about recovering from both rowing and strength training. You’ll learn all about active and passive recovery techniques, finding a recovery protocol that works for you, and of course WHY recovery is so vital to both short and long-term improvement, health, and performance.

Hear it also on Soundcloud and iTunes

0:00 — Re-introductions and what we’ve been up to over summer and fall

5:15 — Common and controllable factors that rowers can use to improve their recovery from training

22:20 — How to develop your own personal recovery protocol

45:50 — What you can do right now from home to start recovering better

53:38 — Last words from Will, Blake, and Joe

Questions, Comments, Feedback? We’d love to hear from you.

Will Ruth: Twitter, Facebook, StrengthCoachWill.com

Blake Gourley: Twitter, Facebook, RowingStrength.com

Joe Deleo: Twitter, Facebook, LeoTraining.io

Episode 1: Overview of Rowing Strength Training

Episode 2: Strength Training for Performance

Episode 3: Strength Training for Injury Prevention

Podcast: Winning Youth Coaching

A few months ago I wrote an article about my five tips for new coachespodcastcover-1024x1024In tip #3, “You Still Have Practice,” I listed off my go-to resources for authors, speakers, blogs, and podcasts that I follow, and one of those was the Winning Youth Coaching podcast. Host Craig Haworth brings on a different coach for each episode from a variety of different backgrounds, sports, and specialities. I find his questions and his guests to bring a great blend of thoughtful discussion of youth coaching as well as actionable takeaways. After listing this as a resource, Craig contacted me and offered me to come on the show as a guest. So, here we go!

http://www.winningyouthcoaching.com/wyc-093/

2:15: My background, athletic bio, and how I got into coaching (more…)

FAQ: Overhead Press for Rowing

The overhead press is a lift that has great potential for rowers, but also carries more risk than other lifts. The unfortunate result of this is that most tend to discard it from programs when a few simple technical tweaks, adjustments, or mobility drills may be all you need to get on the right track. Executed correctly, the OHP strengthens the entire upper body and builds a bulletproof upper back for better connection and power transfer through the entire stroke. Many rowers with weak shoulder girdles can’t sustain the amount of force that their legs can produce. Their legs go down hard, but their upper-back rounds and all that pressure never makes it down the oar handle. The OHP is also a great developer of many muscles that rowing fails to, making it a great “bang-for-your-buck” exercise for the scapular muscles, triceps, and deltoids.

Thoracic spine, or mid-back, ohpmobility is crucial to being able to perform the overhead press. While thoracic mobility is something that many rowers DO struggle with, it is important to make sure that the athlete receives plenty of instruction before making a diagnosis. Often, what looks like a mobility restriction is actually just an athlete who doesn’t understand the correct technique.

Review the basic technical cues in my “How to Train Your Rower” series on the overhead press. The most common errors I see are starting from a poor rack position, not pressing the bar back toward the forehead, and arching at the low-back. Check out the video below for a detailed explanation and demonstration. (more…)

Guest Post: 5 Lacrosse Life Lessons

Check out my guest post at TeamSnap today for 5 life lessons young men and women can learn from playing lacrosse!

https://blog.teamsnap.com/general-sports/5-lessons-young-athletes-learn-from-lacrosse

It’s off-season time for spring lacrosse and you want to make sure to get the most out of your training! While you’re here, check out my off-season training resources for lacrosse and drop me a comment if you have any questions.

6 Fundamental Skills for Lacrosse

General Off-Season Guide

2015 Off-Season Conditioning Plan

Footwork and Agility Drills

Basic Stickwork Demo

All Lacrosse Articles

A Coach’s Guide to Inclusivity

In part one last week, we covered person-first language, took a detailed look at what it means to truly be inclusive, and evaluated the differences (or lack thereof) in characteristics of athletes with and without disabilities. In part two, we’ll use the critical theory to look at how sport reflects society for people with disabilities, the concept of social settings to check the message your program is sending to people with disabilities, and wrap things up with an action plan for coaches.

Sport as a Model of Society

Especially in an Olympic year, we constantly hear about the values of sport in society. Sports build character, sports teach life lessons, sports teach the value of hard work, team work, self-confidence, and so on. There is no doubt that sport can be a powerful way to do all of these things, but only when done with the goal of doing so. Just like playing a team-building game on the first day of practice doesn’t automatically build a rock-solid team with no further effort, the messages you want to send and the lessons you want to teach with sport need to be consistently evaluated and reinforced to be effective.

One way that we can evaluate sports in society is with the Critical Theory. This is one of five main sociological theories that has guided sociological research for the last fifty years, and focuses on the power dynamics present in a given environment [3]. Someone using critical theory will see sport is an area where culture and social relations can be produced and changed. History has proven that this is the case in sport, from race relations to gender IMG_6575(1)stereotypes, and hopefully now to disability. Main questions to ask of your program from a critical theory perspective include:

  • How do people without disabilities interact with, influence, and make decisions for those with disabilities?
  • How is power shared between individuals with and without disabilities? What is the balance of competitive opportunities, resources, equipment, coaching, and more?

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